A first-of-its-kind facility

Seattle Humane is working with Animal Arts Design Studios and other trusted partners to design a new facility that incorporates the best practices for animal health and welfare and high-volume medical care and adoptions. It’ll be a practical building with spaces that work for both animals and the people who care for them. It’ll also be a place focused on animal happiness and health, a place without the stigma often associated with shelters. Most important of all, it’ll be a place that allows us to have even greater impact by saving even more lives.

Our pledge to you

A safe, efficient, and modern new facility will enable us to place more than 10,000 animals in loving homes every year, compared to the 7,000 we place now. In the first 10 years:

100,000

dogs, cats & critters will be placed with loving families

200,000

pets will receive high-quality medical care

25,000

pets will be rescued from high-kill shelters/shelterless areas

80,000

low income household pets will receive spay/neuter services

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    A unique alliance

    We’ve formed a unique and exciting alliance with the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Our new teaching hospital will provide an extraordinary education in community-based, wellness-centered primary animal care for WSU veterinary students.

    The alliance between our organizations is already showing dramatic results. Vet students are already doing rotations at Seattle Humane, and 75 students will cycle through in 2015. Many of these students will go on to make careers out of shelter medicine or will volunteer for their local shelters.

    This alliance allows us to maintain or improve our life-saving rate, which is currently 98 percent. In FY 2015-16, we saved and placed nearly 7,000 homeless pets. But we know animal people can do even more, and this partnership will push us in that direction.

  •  

    A unique alliance

    We’ve formed a unique and exciting alliance with the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Our new teaching hospital will provide an extraordinary education in community-based, wellness-centered primary animal care for WSU veterinary students.

    The alliance between our organizations is already showing dramatic results. Vet students are already doing rotations at Seattle Humane, and 75 students will cycle through in 2016. Many of these students will go on to make careers out of shelter medicine or will volunteer for their local shelters.

    This alliance allows us to maintain or improve our life-saving rate, which is currently 98 percent. In FY 2014-15, we saved and placed more than 7,000 homeless pets. But we know animal people can do even more, and this partnership will push us in that direction.

  •  

    A unique alliance

    We’ve formed a unique and exciting alliance with the Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine. Our new teaching hospital will provide an extraordinary education in community-based, wellness-centered primary animal care for WSU veterinary students.

    The alliance between our organizations is already showing dramatic results. Vet students are already doing rotations at Seattle Humane, and 75 students will cycle through in 2016. Many of these students will go on to make careers out of shelter medicine or will volunteer for their local shelters.

    This alliance allows us to maintain or improve our life-saving rate, which is currently 98 percent. In FY 2014-15, we saved and placed more than 7,000 homeless pets. But we know animal people can do even more, and this partnership will push us in that direction.

FAQs

Have questions about the campaign or our new facility? We’ve got answers!

After conducting an extensive property search and performing a survey of our current site in Bellevue, we have decided to build the new adoption center, animal shelter and primary care teaching hospital on our current site.

The total budget for the new 57,000-square-foot adoption center, animal shelter and primary care teaching hospital is $30 million. This includes $20.3 million in construction costs; $7.1 million in permitting, design and medical equipment; and $2.5 million in fundraising and marketing costs. The new facility includes a full medical center and will incorporate hospital-quality materials and ventilation systems, advanced technological equipment, infectious disease prevention features, acoustic design to control for barking, and the largest possible animal housing areas to reduce stress on the animals.

Given the nature of our programs and operations, phasing construction is not practical or desirable. Our plan is to temporarily relocate administrative operations from the current Resource Building to rented space off-campus, tear down the Resource Building and construct the new facility in its place. Shelter operations will continue in the existing buildings until the new facility is complete and up and running. The last step of the process will be demolishing the current shelter facilities to make way for parking to service the entire campus.

The $30 million project will be funded by private philanthropy, raised through our campaign. Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine (WSU CVM) is committed to raising an additional $5 million to support future operations.

Seattle Humane and WSU CVM have a Memorandum of Understanding and a Strategic Alliance Operating Agreement. These agreements outline the mutual obligations of Seattle Humane and WSU CVM, including WSU CVM’s obligation for funding the faculty, staff, and facility, as well as operation costs associated with its teaching program. WSU CVM will seek private support for an endowed faculty chair position ($3 million) and an initial operating fund for the first four years ($2 million). WSU CVM will lease space for their portion of the new facility. Seattle Humane will cover increased operating costs in the new facility (expected to rise from about $6.6 million to $9 million annually) through projected increases in fees (earned income) and ongoing fundraising efforts.

As a private, non-profit agency, Seattle Humane has no affiliation with Regional Animal Services of King County (Kent) or with Seattle Animal Shelter, both of which are municipal shelters supported by tax dollars and animal license fees. Seattle Humane transfers in animals from both public and private agencies throughout the county and state and expects to increase this life-saving program with an expanded campus.

At Seattle Humane, every dollar is put to work helping animals in need and bringing people and pets together. In 2015, for the sixth year, Seattle Humane received a 4-star rating—the highest possible rating for financial management—from Charity Navigator, the nation’s leading, independent charity evaluation group. This designation puts Seattle Humane in the top 4 percent of non-profit organizations nationally that are evaluated by Charity Navigator. Seattle Humane keeps administrative and fundraising costs to a minimum, devoting 80 cents of every dollar directly to the animals in its care. Seattle Humane is working with Animal Arts Design Studios, design experts who have built over 400 shelters and animal hospitals, to make sure the organization is investing in a long-term solution that will take us into the next 100 years. The shelter design and interior materials have all been carefully selected to ensure durability and to withstand the constant cleaning and wear-and-tear that occurs in a shelter and hospital environment.

Yes. Prior to initiating the campaign, the Collins Group completed an extensive campaign feasibility study. It concluded that Seattle Humane has the necessary donor base, breadth of potential prospects, engaged and invested stakeholders, and the staff expertise and effectiveness needed to complete this project. The board made a commitment to have 100% participation and fund 10% of the overall $30 million fundraising goal. Together the board exceeded that goal and raised over $5 million. Seattle Humane is financially strong. Figures for 2013/2014 included revenues of $6.189 million, expenditures of $6.105 million and healthy reserves of approximately $4 million. Additionally, Seattle Humane has maintained balanced budgets over the past decade and has a small endowment of approximately $900,000. Eighty percent of the annual budget comes from diverse sources of private contributions, which has grown even through recent years of economic recession.

The board and staff are highly confident in Seattle Humane’s ability to raise the full amount necessary to complete this project, expand our impact and save even more animal lives. Constructing a smaller building would mean reducing animal housing areas and/or future capacity for program expansion. The board has determined that such concessions would ultimately impede the organization’s mission and long-term plan for the new facility. Therefore, if fundraising efforts do fall short, the primary option is to postpone construction until the needed funds are secured. A secondary option to cover a smaller shortfall would be to use unfinished shell space for administration and education areas within the new building until the needed funds are secured.

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